Skip to Main Content

The Process of Positive Behavior Support (PBS)

Step Five: Behavior Support Plan Development

previous page page 6 of 10 next page

Consequence Strategies

Consequence strategies are the responses to behavior used by caregivers and professionals when the child engages in challenging behavior. The most important features of consequence strategies are that selected procedures will make the challenging behavior ineffective and less useful and that rewards provided to the child for appropriate behavior will be either equal to or exceed rewards for engaging in challenging behavior. With respect to the latter, this feature is achieved in two different ways: 1) Reinforcement is provided to encourage the use of socially-appropriate replacement behaviors; and 2) reinforcement is withheld to ensure that the behavior won’t work for the child (i.e., result in reinforcement). The most commons strategy that is used in response to a young child’s challenging behavior is to redirect the child to use the replacement behavior and then follow with reinforcement. When that occurs, the child still gets their needs met and has a reminder that the replacement skill is the behavior to use to gain access or to escape an activity, object, or interaction.

Examples of consequence strategies for behaviors intended to obtain attention, objects, or activities

Examples of consequence strategies for behaviors intended to escape activities, demands, and social interactions

previous page page 6 of 10 next page