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The Process of Positive Behavior Support (PBS)

Step Five: Behavior Support Plan Development

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Prevention Strategies

Prevention strategies include the responses that caregivers and professionals provide or the alterations that may be made to an environment that make challenging behavior irrelevant (Hieneman et al., 1999). For example, if a child has difficulty playing with an adult because he doesn’t understand turn taking, a prevention strategy may be to announce and signal turn taking to the child. Another example includes visual strategies used to inform a child who has difficulty with transitions that a transition is soon to follow. Making challenging behavior irrelevant typically involves changing the physical setting of an environment, enriching the environment, providing the child with more information or adaptive strategies, decreasing demands by adapting tasks or routines, increasing predictability, and providing choices to the child. These strategies alone will not resolve challenging behavior, but they will reduce the child’s need to use challenging behavior while the child is learning more socially-appropriate replacement skills.

Examples of prevention strategies for behaviors intended to obtain attention, objects, or activities

Examples of prevention strategies for behaviors intended to escape activities, demands, and social interactions

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