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Systems and Procedures

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Issue Briefs

  • Preventing the Use of Restraint and Seclusion with Young ChildrenIssue Brief: Preventing the Use of Restraint and Seclusion with Young Children: The Role of Effective, Positive Practices
    In recent years, there have been major concerns expressed regarding the use of restraint and seclusion to control the behavior of children with disabilities and/or challenging behavior. In May of 2009, for example, the US Government Accountability Office (GAO) released findings regarding a number of cases in which seclusion and restraint were abused to the point that children were physically and psychologically injured. Some children even died while being restrained. The great potential for abuse and injury has led many school districts, state agencies, and state governments to issue policies, regulations and laws that limit the use of restraint and seclusion. Many of these regulations and statutes effectively prohibit the use of restraint and seclusion except in cases of orthopedic necessity and obvious emergencies in which a child is in imminent danger. Still, there remains uncertainty about what constitutes restraint and seclusion and what should be done as an alternative.The purpose of this document is to review these issues and discuss positive strategies that can be used to prevent behaviors that could lead to considerations of these invasive and potentially-dangerous practices. (February, 2011).
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  • Administrator Brief: Integrating Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation with the Pyramid ModelIssue Brief: Integrating Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation with the Pyramid Model
    A growing number of states and communities are implementing the Pyramid Model in early care and education settings, and in many of these places there are also early childhood mental health consultation (ECMHC) programs operating. This practice brief provides an overview of ECMHC, how it can support the implementation of the Pyramid Model and the issues that arise when administrators seek to integrate these two approaches at the state and local levels. Mental health consultants can: (1) serve as coaches for implementing the Pyramid practices; (2) serve as adjuncts to coaches, by working with children, families and teachers; and (3) use the Pyramid Model to inform and organize their own strategies for working with teachers and families. (November, 2009).
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  • Administrator Brief: Administrator Strategies that Support High Fidelity Implementation of the Pyramid Model for Promoting Social-Emotional Competence & Addressing Challenging BehaviorIssue Brief: Administrator Strategies that Support High Fidelity Implementation of the Pyramid Model for Promoting Social-Emotional Competence & Addressing Challenging Behavior
    Implementing the Pyramid Model with fidelity and achieving positive outcomes for children and their families requires that administrators understand their roles in the implementation process. Every administrative decision impacts program quality and sustainability. This Issue Brief underscores the importance of facilitative administrative practices that provide sustained commitment, timely training, competent coaching, the use of process and outcome data for decision-making, and the development of policies and procedures that are aligned with high fidelity implementation (July, 2009).
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  • Administrator Brief: Promoting Social, Emotional and Behavioral Outcomes of Young Children Served Under IDEAIssue Brief: Promoting Social, Emotional and Behavioral Outcomes of Young Children Served Under IDEA
    A growing body of evidence confirms that serious and persistent challenging behaviors in early childhood directly relate to later problems in school success, social relationships, educational and vocational success, and social adjustment. This brief addresses several important questions policy makers may have about challenging behavior and how these issues relate to young children served under IDEA (January, 2007).
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Policy Summit Presentations (2003-2006)

As part of its work, TACSEI's predecessor, the Center for Evidence-Based Practice: Young Children with Challenging Behavior, convened an annual Policy Makers’ Summit in Washington, D.C each November from 2003 to 2006. The annual Summit brought together individuals who were able to influence federal and state policy, created a forum for discussion and collaborative action planning, and allowed participants to review research findings and collaboratively identify issues and initiatives to improve social and behavioral outcomes for young children.

Below are select presentations that were given at these valuable events:

Guest Speakers

Research Findings and Issues for Implementation, Policy and Scaling Up

Supporting Families and Their Very Young Children

Research to Practice

Policy Summit Group Work Results

Policy Summit Attendees